Panel

Plenary #2: Feminist Approaches to Reproductive and Genetic Technologies: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

Thursday, 6 May
11:15 - 12:45

Facilitator: Ruth Hubbard

This plenary will address the various responses of feminists (historically and currently, in different geographical and social locations) to reproductive and genetic technologies.

The historical dimension will include feminist and social justice responses to early developments in assisted reproductive technology (including IVF, gamete donation, and surrogacy). How are these debates/issues similar or different from the issues we are faced with today, and what lessons can be learned?

The geographical dimension will describe approaches that different countries have taken in regulating (or not regulating) reproductive technologies. Brief descriptions of the policy systems in the U.S., the UK, Canada, and Germany will be provided, compared, and contrasted.

The panel will also look at related issues: coercive state-mandated sterilization, U.S.-sponsored population control policies around the world, controversies about dangerous contraceptives, private incentives for sterilization for poor women. We will consider the links between the eugenics of the past (U.S. and/or Europe) and the new human genetics, and ask how the discourse of eugenics is being used in current debates and what are appropriate and inappropriate uses of this term.

  SPEAKERS ORGANIZATION TITLE  
 Lori Andrews Chicago-Kent College of Law  
 Marsha J. Tyson Darling Center for African-American and Ethnic Studies, Adelphi University  
 Rayna Rapp New York University  
 Ingrid Schneider ReproKult Feminism and ReproGenetics: Experiences and Lessons from Germany  

DOCUMENTS FOR THIS PANEL SUBMITTED BY PANEL SPEAKERS:

* Why Should Women Care About Genes, Gender and Justice?, by Lori Andrews, submitted by Lori Andrews
Bringing the Intersection of Race, Gender and Class to the Center from the Margins, by Marsha J. Tyson Darling
Distributive Justice Issues and the Construction of State Interests Re: Women of Color, by Marsha J. Tyson Darling
Equity, Ethics and the Privatization of Life in BioAgriculture, by Marsha J. Tyson Darling
Human Rights for All: Understanding and Applying Intersectionality to Confront Globalization, by Marsha J. Tyson Darling
Issues to Keep Your Eye on Concerning Gender and the New Technologies, by Marsha J. Tyson Darling
The State, Friend or Foe?: Distributive Justice Issues and African American Women (Part 1), by Marsha J. Tyson Darling
The State, Friend or Foe?: Distributive Justice Issues and African American Women (Part 2), by Marsha J. Tyson Darling
What’s Mine is Mine, and What’s Yours is Mine: Intellectual Property Rights, Patents and Biopiracy in the Genetics Age, by Marsha J. Tyson Darling
Will a New Century Bring Biocolonialism for Indigenous and People of Color?, by Marsha J. Tyson Darling
Eugenics Unbound: Race, Gender and Genetics, by Marsha J. Tyson Darling
Gendered Globalization: State Interests, Women of Color and Marginalized Women, by Marsha J. Tyson Darling
Ethics or politics? Why abortion and embryo research must be treated differently, by Sigrid Graumann/ Elke H. Mildenberger, submitted by Ingrid Schneider

DOCUMENTS FOR THIS PANEL SUBMITTED BY OTHER CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS:

Parenthood and Embodiment: Reflections on Biology, Intentionality, and Autonomy, by Adrienne Asch
Feminism, Bioethics and Genetics, Part 1, by Adrienne Asch & Gail Geller, submitted by Adrienne Asch
Feminism, Bioethics, and Genetics, Part 2, by Adrienne Asch & Gail Geller, submitted by Adrienne Asch
What Genetic Modification Means for Women, by Judith Levine, submitted by Judith Levine
Abortion in India, by Rupsa Mallik, submitted by Rupsa Mallik
Reproductive Technologies in India - Confronting Differences, by Rupsa Mallik, submitted by Rupsa Mallik
Race and the New Reproduction, by Dorothy Roberts, submitted by Dorothy Roberts